Hello, My Name Is…

One of the most challenging jobs out there has always been that of a salesperson. You really can’t take rejection personally or you’re in the wrong business. Whether selling ad space over the phone or reaching out to prospective customers in person, few methods are more intimidating than cold calling. The people in this line of work must always be “on,” regardless of whatever else is happening in the rest of their lives. Imagine having to sound perky and excited, making call after call, eight hours a day, five days a week. Not only is that a helluva lot of talking, but likely includes a few mid-sentence no thank-you’s and many a voice mail along the way. It takes a very thick skin to make it in this line of work.

As teenagers, most of us experience sales firsthand in the form of that after-school job at the local Burger King or Macy’s. From taking drive-through orders to mingling with customers on the floor, we learn the art at a young age, particularly if the position includes commission. If you can talk the talk, you’re golden. In few positions is this more apparent than that of a telephone fundraiser--talk about a difficult job! These people pick up the phone, hope for a live one, and deliver their speech with the goal of obtaining a financial contribution from the person on the other end of the line. It’s the ultimate off-the-cuff conversation.

In an effort to warm up the cold calling, experts keep their voices sing-song-y, bright and full of enthusiasm. Some even keep a script close at hand for quick reference. Think of the last time someone called you to pitch their cause. Were they successful? Or did you let the answering machine kick in to screen the call? With so many obstacles to overcome, those who earn their keep in the world of unsolicited dialing are true troupers; the backbone of business. At Auqeo!, we turn that former “no” into a green light/go! www.auqeo.net

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