Change is in the Air

Nothing is certain but death and taxes. If author Daniel Defoe was alive today, he'’d likely be amazed at the staying power of his proverb. Change is necessary to grow and learn, but rarely is it willingly embraced. When things are going well, why rock the boat unnecessarily? Sometimes there isn’t a choice, like when the employees at Marie Callender’s in Elk Grove showed up for work on a Monday morning in June 2011, only to find the doors locked and the restaurant dark. Memphis-based Perkins & Marie Callender’s, Inc., filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, closing 13 of its California locations the day before, even ousting some customers mid-meal! Imagine suddenly losing your job in an already shaky economy--not a happy prospect in the least.

On the flip side, change doesn’t always mean something negative. A recent story comes to mind about a dear friend who threw her hat in the ring for a seemingly impossible-to-obtain upper-level position. After sweating out the panel interview and many a restless night awaiting the committee’s decision, she magically got the job! Already in management, she went from manager to regional leader, and snagged a massive raise, merrily announcing the good news to family and close friends. Even when the odds are stacked against us, we have but to think of stories like this which show that we can make things happen for ourselves. We are not at the mercy of where the wind blows us.

Like a caterpillar turns into a butterfly, everything eventually goes through a metamorphosis, whether of its own volition or due to external forces. In the business world, it’s important to evolve with the times. Strategic thinking and planning lead to a company’s longevity. What worked last year might be old hat 12 months later. By being aware of the latest trends, we can mold our organizations accordingly to stay current and ready for whatever changes come our way. www.auqeo.net.

Add new comment

Filtered HTML

  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.